Review: Dreamland by Keith Nixon

Keith Nixon’s novel The Fix was one of the best I read last year (only just missing out on my annual ‘Best Of’ list). This tale of crooked financiers, betrayal, and murder featured some great characters, but my favourite was without doubt the homeless Russian man Konstantin Boryakov. Despite his appearance, he had a very specific skillset, and was as hard and sharp as a box of titanium nails. Well, Dreamland is the story of how he became that hobo. He’s ex-KGB, just out of prison, and freshly touched down in Margate, enjoying (not) the delights of the Dreamland amusement arcade, where he makes the mistake of crossing dealer Dave The Rave – or, more to the point, The Rave makes the mistake of crossing and trying to steal from him. Konstantin puts his training to good use and defends himself. He also takes Dave’s money and gets rid of the drug wraps to Dave is carrying for somebody a lot higher up the criminal food chain. And from there it only gets worse for all of them…

Dreamland is a highly enjoyable tale in its own right but also works as a kind of a taster for Nixon’s longer work. The same short snappy sentences, the same foul-mouthed, funny dialogue, and the same tight plotting that made his debut such a pleasure to read are here too in miniature. Konstantin is also great character to spend time with: brutal, hard as nails, curt, weary and also at times capable of tenderness and affection, he lights up the narrative like a beacon. Dreamland comes highly recommended by me. Grab it today and then bite your nails and wait for the arrival of the next Konstantin novellas from Caffeine Nights – they’re just as good as this.

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