Prices rises and general warnings

As of the 1 August, The Glasgow Grin will be going up in price from 99p/$0.99 to £2.99/$3.99. The lower price point has obviously assisted sales that are creeping towards the 3,000 barrier in the UK, and helped shift numerous copies of my other novels and novellas, but I feel now is the time to raise the price. I’ve been selling GG cheaply for far longer than I ever planned (it was originally only going to be 99p until the end of March), and all good things must come to an end.

Will this decision affect sales? Undoubtedly, and for the worse. However, I don’t think £2.99 is an unfair price to pay for several years of my life, and something that will give readers many hours of enjoyment (I hope). It will, I suspect, negatively impact sales of my other books, too. But I’ve been worrying more about my sales recently than I’ve been doing actual writing. I check my sales figures with depressing and monotonous regularity; in fact, I’d even go so far as to suggest that it has become a complusion. So, come August, I’ll be avoiding my sales figures like they’re some sort of life-threatening disease.

The other thing I plan to do is put bad language and violence warnings clearly within the product description/synopsis of my books. I’m getting tired of the prudish, and those of a weak disposition, giving me one-star reviews because they can’t handle bad language or sex or strong violence. Frankly, I’d rather warn them from the start that my work is hardcore crime fiction, so they don’t make the mistake of buying my stuff and complaining about it later. A clear warning (PROBABLY IN CAPS, SO THERE’S NO MISTAKE) at least gives readers a chance to make an informed decision about my work (although the current synopsis for my latest novel states clearly: The Glasgow Grin combines intense, fast-paced plotting, ferocious ultra-violence, snappy, foul-mouthed dialogue, and a rogue’s gallery of twisted villains…).

So there you have it!

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Review: How’s The Pain by Pascal Garnier

Simon is an ageing hitman with a terminal illness undertaking one last job before retirement. He befriends the young and simple-minded Bernard and employs him as his driver (telling him that he’s a vermin exterminator). Bernard jumps at the chance of seeing the coast and making some money. But what happens is a road trip that the young man will never forget.

Garnier’s How’s The Pain is not a bad read, but it isn’t stunning either (particularly as Garnier has been highly lauded by many mainstream critics). Based on the evidence of this novel, Garnier isn’t up there at the summit of French crime fiction with Manchette and Simenon, but he’s still a more than decent writer. His overuse of comic simile and metaphor grates at times. Simile is a difficult thing to get right and when it is overdone or overused it distracts from the story – something that happens several times during the course of this tale. However, when he keeps it simple, Garnier is very effective. Character seems to be where his real strength lies: Simon, Bernard, Anais and Rose are all great characters with very human flaws and foibles. And their interplay and dialogue is what keeps the interest high. Also, Garnier writes a couple of brief but effective action set pieces. Nothing spectacular, but a solid novel for those looking for something character based.